Workshops

Management of Feeding and Swallowing Difficulties in Paediatrics

Tuesday & Wednesday 25th-26th September 2018

This two-day programme will provide delegates with the skills needed to effectively assess and manage feeding and swallowing difficulties in children. The course comprises workshops and lectures.  Workshop topics and speakers are continuously updated, so please check back regularly.
 
Over these two days, delegates will rotate in small groups between several parallel workshops to cover all programme topics.
 
Workshops will include:
 

  • Instrumental and clinical examination of feeding and swallowing in paediatrics

  • Management of feeding and swallowing in neonates

  • Management of feeding and swallowing difficulties in children with learning disability, physical disability, and cerebral palsy

  • Tube feeding in paediatric populations 

Tuesday 25th September 2018 - Assessment in Paediatrics

9:00 - 9:10

Welcome (Professor Margaret Walshe)

09:10 - 09:45

Paediatric feeding and swallowing assessment: An overview and a reflection on exploring typical population data on feeding, eating and drinking and its relevance to assessment (Celia Harding & Lenie Van den Engel Hoek)

09:45 - 10:45

4 simultaneous workshops

10:45 - 11:15

Coffee break

11:15 - 12:15

4 simultaneous workshops

12:15 - 13:15

4 simultaneous workshops

13:15 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 15:00

4 simultaneous workshops

15:00 - 15:30

Tea Break

15:30 - 16:30

Discussion Session

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Day 1: Assessment Workshops

Wednesday 26th September 2018 - Intervention in Paediatrics

9:00 - 9:10

Welcome (Professor Margaret Walshe)

09:10 - 09:45

Challenges in Paediatric feeding and swallowing intervention Dr Kelly Weir

09:45 - 10:45

4 simultaneous workshops

10:45 - 11:15

Coffee break

11:15 - 12:15

4 simultaneous workshops

12:15 - 13:15

4 simultaneous workshops

13:15 - 14:00

Lunch

14:00 - 15:00

4 simultaneous workshops

15:00 - 15:30

Tea Break

15:30 - 16:30

A discussion about EBP and interventions etc. Future directions Dr Kelly Weir

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Day 2: Intervention workshops

Confirmed Speakers

 

Celia Butler

Celia Butler is a registered Speech & Language Therapist, born in New Zealand with over 15 years’ clinical experience across both adult and paediatrics, principally in the acute care setting. She has worked in New Zealand, Australia and Ireland. Since 2007, Celia has worked as the Senior Speech and Language Therapist with the Paediatric Cardiology Team in Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin. Her role involves the assessment and management of feeding and communication difficulties in infants and children with congenital heart disorders. Celia is involved in running weekly videofluoroscopy swallow study clinics. Celia has a special interest in feeding-tube dependency and tube–weaning. She established the National ‘Anyone Can Eat’ inpatient tube-weaning programme in 2008 winning two HSE National awards in 2010.

 

Celia is passionate about breastfeeding/breastmilk feeding and sits on the hospital’s Breastfeeding Committee. She coordinates clinical supervision and mentoring of undergraduate and post-graduate speech and language therapists in the area of paediatric dysphagia. She has presented at a range of Speech and Language Therapy Conferences, Cardiology and Paediatric Otlaryngology Conferences across Ireland and Europe about tube weaning, feeding in infants post cardiac surgery with vocal cord paralysis, and more recently has been involved in introducing FEES as a means of assessing breastfeeding babies in conjunction with ENT.

 

Celia Harding

From 1986 – 2004 Celia Harding has been a full time, practicing speech and language therapist, developing expertise in the area of paediatric dysphagia, both congenital and acquired disorders in acute and community settings. Since 2004, she has worked at City University of London, with an honorary contract as a speech and language therapist at the Royal Free Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Main areas of research have been in the areas of learning disability and swallowing problems, in particular premature infant feeding. Research aims have been focused on investigating typical strategies used by speech and language therapists in dysphagia practice. Many of Celia Harding’s publications focus on neonatal feeding.

 

Karen van Hulst

Karen van Hulst is Speech Language Therapist and Clinical Epidemiologist at the Radboud university medical centre in the Netherlands (department Paediatric Rehabilitation). Since 2012 she is working on her PhD project concerning swallowing and feeding in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) (expected 2018). In addition, she has contributed to the development of a national evidenced based guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of children with spasticity. Karen is specialised in swallowing and feeding problems in children with CP and has carried out a reliability study of the EDACS (Eating and Drinking Classification System for children with CP) in the Netherlands (publication JPRM accepted).

She is a member of the Swallowing and Saliva Control Team at the Radboud university medical centre. Since 2000, 700 children have been diagnosed by this team and treated using different saliva control interventions.

 

In addition, Karen is lecturing and runs courses for health care professionals in paediatric rehabilitation for CP. Karen has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and has achieved international acclaim from her research and work in this area.

 

Lenie van den Engel-Hoek

Dr. van den Engel-Hoek is speech language therapist in the pediatric team of the Radboud university medical centre in Nijmegen (the Netherlands). She combines patient clinical care with education and scientific research, focused on oral motor problems (dysphagia and dysarthria) in infants and children, especially with neuromuscular diseases.

She is a member of the Swallowing and Saliva Control Team at the Radboud university medical centre and is involved in the diagnosis of complex swallowing problems in infants and children.

 

She is involved in several research projects on the development of new assessments of dysphagia in infants and children. In addition, she has developed the use of quantitative muscle ultrasound for oral muscles, which supports the diagnose of feeding and swallowing problems.

Lenie is lecturing and runs courses for health care professionals in paediatric rehabilitation for infants and children with feeding and swallowing problems with a wide range of diseases.

 

Lenie has published in peer-reviewed journals on feeding and swallowing problems, especially in infants and children with neuromuscular disorders.

 

Sandra de Groot

Sandra de Groot is Speech Language Therapist at the Radboud university medical centre in the Netherlands (department Paediatric Rehabilitation). She is involved in the clinical care of preterm infants and has developed a checklist for oral feeding in the NICU, which has been implemented in several hospitals in the Netherlands.

In addition, she is specialised in swallowing and feeding problems in children with CP. She is a member of the Swallowing and Saliva Control Team at the Radboud university medical centre and supports data collection for scientific research.

 

Sandra is lecturing and runs courses for health care professionals in paediatric rehabilitation for premature infants and children with feeding and swallowing problems with a wide range of diseases.

 

Zelda Greene

The current clinical caseload of Zelda is primarily infants and babies who are long term tracheostomy and ventilator dependent, often premature with ongoing associated respiratory, ENT and complex medical conditions. Clinical and research interests include oral stimulation in preterm infants, a Cochrane review published Oct 2016. They have also developed local practice guidelines for babies who are tracheostomy and ventilator dependent in relation to modified speaking valves and the impact that has on both feeding and communication, paper submitted for publication. A non-NICU infant feeding screening tool for infants at risk of feeding disorders is underway in their centre in association with the Trinity College Dublin (TCD) MSc programme. Exploration of issues surrounding paediatric feeding tubes and transitioning to oral feeding is also underway in conjunction with clinical nutrition colleagues.

 

Zelda has contributed to the National Clinical Programme for Neonatology and Paediatrics, National Guidelines for SLTs in Tracheostomy care, and internationally the 2017 WHO guideline on protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding in facilities providing maternity and new-born services. 

 

Zelda has Academic Teaching experience at both undergraduate and postgraduate level in TCD for the past 10 years, focusing on both adult and paediatric populations. Involved in ongoing postgraduate clinical education of MSc students in current work setting as well as undergraduate clinical training.

 

Kelly Weir


Dr Kelly Weir is a conjoint principal research fellow (allied health) at Griffith University & Gold Coast Health, Queensland Australia. She is a certified practicing speech pathologist with over 29 years clinical experience, predominantly in tertiary state-wide paediatric hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Kelly researches in the area of paediatric dysphagia (assessment, treatment) and speech pathology management of medically fragile infants and children in acute care settings. She lectures in paediatric dysphagia at Griffith University, and has over 55 peer reviewed journal publications. Current research projects include investigating instrumental evaluations of paediatric dysphagia, use of telehealth to support speech pathologists training in paediatric videofluoroscopy, use of cervical auscultation to detect aspiration in children, feeding infants on high flow oxygen and investigation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy and disability. Kelly is also part of a research team investigating the impact of research fellows and use of knowledge brokering to increase research capacity in allied health professionals across Gold Coast Health. She particularly supports paediatric allied health practitioners conducting clinical research in the hospital and community settings.

Catherine Cunningham


Catherine qualified as a Speech and Language Therapist in London in 1986 and has been in clinical practice ever since. The first 12 years of her career were mostly spent working in intellectual disability settings both in London and Dublin. She moved to Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin (OLCHC) in 1997. Catherine set up the paediatric dysphagia service in OLCHC. The department has gradually grown and she is now the manager of a department of 9 therapists. Catherine has continued to pursue her clinical practice as well as being a SLT manager. She has a special interest in infants and children with complex airway disorders and in dysphagia in rare diseases and life limiting conditions. Catherine’s research interests include the development of a care pathway for laryngomalacia, the prevalence and nature of feeding and swallowing problems in infants and young children with achondroplasia and oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa – generalized severe. Catherine was one of the lead SLTs involved in the setting up of the first accredited paediatric FEDS qualification course in Ireland in 2004. She has teaching experience at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and together with her colleagues in the SLT department in OLCHC has developed and taught on a course for qualified SLTs addressing issues in the assessment & management of feeding difficulties in infants & children.
Catherine started the videofluoroscopy service in OLCHC and has over 20 years’ experience of running twice weekly videofluoroscopy clinics. Together with her SLT and ENT colleagues, she is currently involved in the introduction of FEES in Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin.

 
 

Sara Dallape

Sara is a Senior Speech and Language Therapist working in Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin. She has 12 years of experience in both acute paediatrics and community services for children with intellectual disability. She is a Senior SLT with the Cardiology Team, working with infants and children with congenital heart disorders. She also has a special interest in infants and children with complex airway disorders and voice disorders and has developed a national service for children with paradoxical vocal fold movement. Sara’s research interests include the development of a care pathway for laryngomalacia, isolated dysphagia in typically developing children and profiling a case series of adolescents with paradoxical vocal fold movement.
Sara has 8 years’ experience of running twice weekly videofluoroscopy clinics and, together with her SLT and ENT colleagues, is currently involved in the introduction of FEES in Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin.

Fay Murphy

Dr Fay Murphy (BA Psychology, MSc Neuroscience, DClin Psy, PG Dip in Paediatric Neuropsychology) is a Clinical Psychologist working in the Lucena Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) in Rathgar. Prior to her return to Ireland in 2014, Dr Murphy spent 13 years as Principal Clinical Psychologist in the Feeding and Eating Disorders Service at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. Dr Murphy has extensive experience of assessing and treating feeding and eating disorders arising in the context of physical illness, intellectual disability, neurodevelopmental disorders and anxiety-based presentations.  Dr Murphy was course director of the Feeding Disorders Clinical Skills Course in the Institute of Child Health, University College London and has longstanding experience of conducting specialist teaching for a variety of healthcare professionals. 

 

John Russell

MbBch Bao Bsc Mch Frcsi Frcs(orl)

Consultant in Paediatric Otolaryngology, Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital Crumlin , Dublin, Ireland

​​John has spent 21 years working as a Consultant in Paediatric Otolaryngology at Crumlin.  He has been National Clinical Lead in Paediatric Otolaryngology since 2015. He completed his Clinical Fellowship in Paediatric Otolaryngology at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in 1995.   He was Programme Director of Otolaryngology at Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland from 2002-2008 and represented Otolaryngology on the Development and Practice Committee of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (2010-2015). He has been a Board Member of the European Society of Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology (ESPO)since 2012, becoming President of ESPO from June 2014 to June 2016 during which period he chaired the organising committee which hosted the ESPO 2014 Congress in Dublin.  He is a Member of American Society of Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology and is currently the Secretary General of Confederation of European Otorhinolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery (CEORL-HNS) from 2017 -2019.  He is a reviewer for a number of journals including International Journal of Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology, CSurgeries International Video Journal, and European Archives of Oto-Rhino –Laryngology. Research interests include Mitomycin and its Effects on Fibroblasts in Cell Culture in conjunction with University College Dublin. 

 
 

Sarah Naughton

 

Sarah currently works as a Senior Dietitian in Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin in Dublin, having joined the hospital in 2011. She is part of the dietetic team covering the nutrional care of cardiac infants and children, where more than 60 infants are discharged home annually on tube feeding and are supported by the team. These infants are then weaned off their tubes after surgery.

Sarah has also worked in the Laura Lynn Children's Hospice, Dublin since 2009 and continues to do so. She has a particular interest in paediatric palliative care and the nutritional support of children with complex medical needs.

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